First Nations justice

Indigenous people are shamefully over-policed and the most incarcerated people on earth, making Indigenous justice a priority for the NSWCCL since its inception in 1963. In 1964 NSWCCL supported Aboriginal rights campaigner Ken Brindle in a civil case against a Newtown police officer that saw him win £400 damages plus costs for malicious prosecution.  The treatment of our First Nations people remains nothing short of shocking today and reconciliation is an urgent priority for Australia. This group's concerns include over-incarceration and deaths in custody; a treaty with the Indigenous people of NSW and, at a national level, the implementation of the 2017 Uluru Statement from the Heart. 


New South Wales Council for Civil Liberties welcomes ALP support for Aboriginal legal aid and justice reinvestment

29 April 2019

The New South Wales Council for Civil Liberties (CCL) has welcomed a pledge by the Australian Labor Party to invest $107 million to address the disproportionate incarceration rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The announcement by Labor’s shadow Indigenous Affairs spokesperson Pat Dodson and shadow Attorney General Mark Dreyfus includes $44 million in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander legal Services, $21.5 million for family violence prevention legal services, $21.75 million for justice reinvestment programs in NSW, Western Australia, Queensland, and the Northern Territory. Labor has also committed to adopting justice targets as part of the Closing the Gap framework.

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