NSWCCL in the media

No response on indefinite detention: Stephen Blanks speaks to ABC's Lateline

Twelve months after the United Nations Human Rights Tribunal criticised the indefinite detention of more than forty refugees with negative security assessments from ASIO, the Abbott government has failed to respond to the tribunal's report.

"Australia's Government is thumbing its nose at the UN, saying, 'We're not interested in what you think about human rights.' "

Video: No response on indefinite detention

Source: ABC 'Lateline', 21/8/2014

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Changes to Australian Security Laws Will Make Illegally Obtained Evidence Permissible in Court

ASIO is pushing for the new laws which are being sold to the public as necessary to guard against terror. Prime Minister Tony Abbott, Attorney General George Brandis and ASIO director general David Irvine have been keen to link the laws to the threat of Australian jihadis fighting overseas.

 

Article: Changes to Australian Security Laws Will Make Illegally Obtained Evidence Permisable in Court

Source: VICE, 19/8/2014

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Privacy advocates criticise far-reaching ASIO surveillance powers

New digital surveillance powers for Australia's top security agency have been described as 'too expansive' by leading civil liberties advocates.

 

Article: Privacy advocates criticise far-reaching ASIO surveillance powers

Source: CNET, 18/8/2014

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NSWCCL President and HR Commissioner Tim Wilson debate the right to be forgotten

NSWCCL President Stephen Blanks and Australian Human Rights Commissioner Tim Wilson debate online privacy and 'the right to be forgotten' with Sky News' David Lipson.

 

Watch now: AGENDA The importance of online privacy

Source: Sky News 'Agenda', 9/8/14

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NSWCCL warns against extraordinary counter-terrorism powers

The Australian Government's latest package of enhanced security and counter-terrorist powers includes a disturbing proposal to reverse the onus of proof on Australians returning from regions of conflict, such that they would be required to prove that they have not been fighting in wars overseas.

This presumption of guilt contravenes the fundamental principles of criminal justice, NSWCCL's Stephen Blanks speaks to ABC News and highlights that security agencies already have "extraordinary powers" for detaining and interrogating citizens, the proposed changes are unnecessary and a step too far.

Video: ABC News 1/8/2014 (Story begins at 11:15)

Source: ABC News 1/8/2014

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NSWCCL's Stephen Blanks discusses Opal cards and the surveillance state on FBi Backchat

NSWCCL President Stephen Blanks speaks to FBi Radio about Opal card privacy concerns , increased ASIO powers and the disturbing proposal to criminalise media reporting of intelligence operations.

Listen: Stephen Blanks: 'The surveillance state is one more step towards being complete'

Source: FBi Radio 'Backchat', 19/7/2014

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NSWCCL opposes draconian whistleblower penalties in news security laws

George Brandis's new spying laws will include measure to criminalise media reporting of Snowden-style leaks

Article: Journalists will face jail over spy leaks under new security laws

Source: The Guardian, 16/7/2014

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CCLs call for consultation on new national security laws

The federal government will seek to introduce legislation giving Australian intelligence agencies new powers and to create a new offence for when intelligence officers take material without appropriate authorisation.

Article: Australian intelligence agencies to be given new powers

Source: The Guardian, 15/7/2014

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NSWCCL claims 100 agencies have access to Opal cards data

NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione has defended police being given powers to access Opal card records as a crucial tool to ensure the "safety and security of the community".

Article: Police Commissioner defends access to Opal card records

Source: Sydney Morning Herald, 15/7/2014

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NSW Opal card raises privacy concerns

Australia's spy agency could get its hands on the home address and travel history of NSW commuters using the state's Opal card, a civil liberty group warns.

Article: NSW Opal card raises privacy concerns

Source: News.com.au, 15/7/2014

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